In pictures: stadiums that rock

Through the use of new cutting-edge technologies and visionary architectural innovations, these sports venues could well be the coliseums of tomorrow

Levi’s Stadium, US

Home to the San Francisco 49ers, the stadium’s proprietary app notifies ticket-holders of the parking lot nearest their seats and guides them through the stadium– and, once connected to the venue’s free Wi-Fi, fans can order food and drink and have it delivered to their seats. The app also offers access to the live game, relevant statistics and even directs users to the closest bathroom with the shortest queue.

Hamdan Sports Complex, Dubai

Hamdan Sports Complex, Dubai
Hamdan Sports Complex, Dubai

Hamdan Sports Complex is one of the world’s largest multi-purpose facilities, hosting many world-class aquatic events, as well as dry sports competitions. This is made possible by its Olympic swimming pool which, when required, converts into a basketball court.  The complex’s ability to host major events both in and out of the water, within the same building, makes it unique.

Wembley Stadium, UK

The biggest football stadium in England (and second largest in Europe), Wembley has free Wi-Fi, mobile ticketing and a stadium app that includes a feed of the latest news, images, and video clips. The app also offers a stadium map to help fans find their seats, and a national travel planner to help plan their journey to and from the grounds.

Qi Zhong Forest Sports City Arena, China

Qi Zhong Forest Sports City Arena, China
Qi Zhong Forest Sports City Arena, China

Designed by Japanese architect Mitsuru Senda, this tennis stadium in Shanghai has been engineered to great aesthetic success. Its crowning jewel is a retractable roof that has been shaped to look like eight petals of a magnolia flower. The magnolia is Shanghai city’s flower and thus, the stadium becomes a symbol for Shanghai itself.

Allianz Arena, Germany

Opened in 2005, this is the home ground of FC Bayern Munich and TSV 1860 München. The Allianz Arena is the first stadium capable of changing colour to reflect which team is playing. Covered by 2,760 diamond-faced panels, the exterior appears white when unlit, but can change colours and create patterns to support the home team.  

National/Kaohsiung Stadium, Taiwan

This is the first stadium in the world to function as its own power source, with over 8,000 solar panels covering its spiral roof and generating most of the energy needed to power the venue. In theory, it could also power up to 80% of the surrounding neighbourhood, and has been certified a “gold level green building” for excelling in the environmental standard of its soil water content, biodiversity and CO2 reduction.

Twickenham Stadium

The home of the English rugby union team, Twickenham is the first in Europe to install free high-density Wi-Fi, enabling visitors to upload and download large amounts of data during the match. It is also the first stadium outside of America to install mid-tier LED screens, and has produced an app so fans can order food, drinks and merchandise.

MetLife Stadium

MetLife Stadium, US
MetLife Stadium, US

At New Jersey’s MetLife, concession stands are digitally connected to the four HD display boards located in each corner of the stadium. It has a total of 2,100 HD monitors across the arena, each receiving over 70 channels of cable TV programming, in addition to the stadium’s own channel. An app is underway but Wi-Fi is already accessible throughout the stadium.